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The Sun’s ‘Quiet’ Regions Are Surprisingly Active

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The Sun’s ‘Quiet’ Regions Are Surprisingly Active

Never judge a calm sun by its boring name. Much of the data from a NASA mission finds that the seemingly small active areas of the Sun are not as latent as the name might suggest.

Researchers in Wales have used data from NASA to examine the outer layer of the atmosphere in the form of the sun’s known solar corona.

The study of the solar corona is of great importance to understand what drives the solar cycle, which is a period of change in 11 years that the sun knows.

The crown can also tell us how it affects the cycle of sunlight and heat production, and how changes related to the cycle can affect the Earth.

The sun’s crown, which means “crown” in Latin and Spanish, consists of plumes of gas and plasma – and temperatures can reach as high as 3.5 million degrees Fahrenheit (2 million degrees Celsius).

Huw Morgan, a researcher at the University of Aberystwyth in Wales Prifysgol, spent many weeks to process seven years of coronal data.
He found that the silent sun – those parts of the crown that had low activity and no sunspots – tasted surprisingly warm temperatures. The new work was detailed today (July 14) in Advances Science magazine.

This image was created by combining 54 observations of the outer atmosphere of the sun, called the crown, in 2013. The horizontal bands above and below the equator are “activity belts” that start closer to poles and gradually move to more latitudes The annual solar cycle progresses. The dark areas are known as the quiet Sun name.

This image was created by combining 54 observations of the outer atmosphere of the sun, called the crown, in 2013.

The horizontal bands above and below the equator are “activity belts” that begin near the poles and gradually move to lower latitudes as the 11-year solar cycle progresses. The dark areas are known as the quiet Sun name.

Beyond the solar corona studies were largely limited to much smaller datasets regions or individuals, said Morgan Space.com.

This study used data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) covering NASA from 2010 to 2017. The enormous amount of information that contributed to Morgan’s results was collected from instruments such as SDO imaging and Helioseismique magnetic magnetic (HMI), Experiment variability Extreme ultraviolet (EVE) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA).

“During the solar cycle, there is more activity, and we have more sunspots – and not a surprise,” said Morgan Space.com. “This has been known for decades. But for me, this is what happens in what we call the quiet sun … it was interesting too.”
The prominences, the solar eruptions and the sunspots in the contest of great solar popularity; The attractive images that SDO features of these solar events are certainly indicative of a general public and scientific interest in them.

These characteristics are most common during the advanced stage of maximum solar cycle cycle change of 11 years. The new findings indicate that there is much to learn by studying periods of relative calm, known as the name of solar minimum.

“Active regions, sunspots have a lot of attention,” Morgan said. “But in reality they are only a small part of the whole sun.”

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